Do learning and development strategies have a part in business strategy?

Visual Courtesy: http://pt.slideshare.net/
Visual Courtesy: http://pt.slideshare.net/

Whilst most organizations have learning and development units the question I’m raising is:
Are organizations really focused on learning and developing the talent pool that they have?

In today’s business environment the competitive edge, for an organization, comes from its culture and its talent. The latter is at the core of success
an organization can achieve.

In the usual commercial organizations, where profitability is the end objective of all activities, learning is often lost in the daily rush of what needs to get done. Resulting in the organization losing sight of developing its critical asset—people.

Without planned development of its people an organization cannot expect to be successful and sustainable in the long run.

What triggered this post is this article:

Continual Learners And Learning Organizations: A Two Way Street Or
A Dead End

It has four simple ideas which I find simple yet oft forgotten in the hustle and bustle of daily work.  

Being stimulated from this article, in this post, I’m taking a look at how the education and professional development sector approaches learning and development in their business strategy.

Is there a lack of focus on learning and development of talent in the higher education and professional development sector?

After all academic institutions, by their very nature, are meant to have an environment focused on learning and development.  If this is true it would mean that such institutions would put talent and their own knowledge thought leadership front and center of their business strategy.  

Or is it that the environment is only created for the students the institutions
cater for?

Looking around one sees the necessity of the academic institutions to operate more and more as commercial entities in order to ensure financial sustainability. That, however, does not absolve the institution from losing focus on its talent and in turn on learning and development. Such a loss of focus would be disastrous as its impacts on the reputation of the institution.

Reputation is a key driver of business continuity for any academic institution.

Such reputation is built through strategically identified initiatives all of which should tie back to a central learning and development focused strategy impacting on the people of the institution and their output. By having clearly identified quality benchmarks of the initiatives the institution can ensure business continuity and commercial sustainability.

A clear focus such as this will lead to the institution developing a competitive edge and become an institution of choice by potential students, the industry it serves as well as the academia.

By investing in its people and its knowledge base strategically, organizations involved in the education and professional development sectors,  can see the positive impact of specific activities in terms of reputation and bottom-line.

 

 
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